Uric acid can enhance MAPK pathway-mediated proliferation in rat primary vascular smooth muscle cells via controlling of mitochondria and caspase-dependent cell death


Dogru S., YAŞAR E., YEŞİLKAYA A.

JOURNAL OF RECEPTORS AND SIGNAL TRANSDUCTION, vol.42, no.3, pp.293-301, 2022 (SCI-Expanded) identifier identifier identifier

  • Publication Type: Article / Article
  • Volume: 42 Issue: 3
  • Publication Date: 2022
  • Doi Number: 10.1080/10799893.2021.1931320
  • Journal Name: JOURNAL OF RECEPTORS AND SIGNAL TRANSDUCTION
  • Journal Indexes: Science Citation Index Expanded (SCI-EXPANDED), Scopus, Academic Search Premier, BIOSIS, Chemical Abstracts Core, EMBASE, MEDLINE
  • Page Numbers: pp.293-301
  • Keywords: Uric acid, VSMCs, proliferation, MAPKs, apoptosis, P38 MAPK, BLOOD-PRESSURE, CARDIOVASCULAR-DISEASE, SIGNALING PATHWAY, PROTEIN-KINASES, HYPERURICEMIA, HYPERTENSION, DIFFERENTIATION, APOPTOSIS, HYPERTROPHY
  • Akdeniz University Affiliated: Yes

Abstract

Hyperuricemia may be a risk factor for cardiovascular diseases such as hypertension and atherosclerosis, but the mechanisms underlying uric acid-induced pathological conditions remain unknown. In this study, we investigated the effect of short time and long-term administration of increasing uric acid concentrations on cell viability, proliferative and apoptotic pathways in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs). Cell viability/proliferation was determined with WST-1 assay. Expression levels of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) (phosphorylated (p)-p38 and p-p44/42 MAPK), extrinsic (caspase 3, caspase 8), and intrinsic (B-cell lymphoma-extra-large (Bcl-xL)) apoptotic pathway proteins were measured by Western blotting. In order to assess the proliferative effects of uric acid incubations on VSMCs, we monitored the proliferative/apoptosis signaling pathways for up to 24 h. Our results indicated that uric acid increases cell viability at time and dose-dependently in VSMCs. Immunoblotting results showed that uric acid treatment elevated the expression level of p-p38 MAPK but did markedly reduce the protein levels of p-p44/42, compared with all the uric acid doses-treated VSMCs, especially at 1 h. Uric acid stimulation increased caspase-3 protein levels and decreased Bcl-xL, but did not alter caspase-8 protein expression at the same dose and time. Furthermore, low uric acid incubations (0-7.5 mg/dL) did not affect any signaling pathways for long time points (6-24 h). In conclusion, our study demonstrates for the first time that VSMCs induced with uric acid can affect cell viability, proliferative, and apoptosis pathways at the widest time and dose range. These findings provide a better understanding of the uric acid effects related to vascular impairments.