The demokidovi-like short winged Glyptobothrus (Orthoptera, Gomphocerinae, Chorthippus) of Anatolia with description of two new species: from Balkans to Caucasus through southern Anatolia


Ciplak B., Mol A., Sirin D., Zeybekoglu U., Taylan M.

TRANSACTIONS OF THE AMERICAN ENTOMOLOGICAL SOCIETY, vol.131, no.3-4, pp.463-489, 2005 (SCI-Expanded) identifier identifier

  • Publication Type: Article / Article
  • Volume: 131 Issue: 3-4
  • Publication Date: 2005
  • Journal Name: TRANSACTIONS OF THE AMERICAN ENTOMOLOGICAL SOCIETY
  • Journal Indexes: Science Citation Index Expanded (SCI-EXPANDED), Scopus
  • Page Numbers: pp.463-489
  • Keywords: Orthoptera, Acrididae, Gomphocerinae, Chorthippus, Glyptobothrus, C. demokidovi, C. kazdaghensis sp n., C. taurensis sp n., biogeography, Anatolia, Caucasus, Turkey, TETTIGONIIDAE, TURKEY, SONG
  • Akdeniz University Affiliated: No

Abstract

The demokidovi-like short winged Glyptobothrus species in Anatolia, belonging to the genus Chorthippus Fieber (Orthoptera, Acrididae, Gomphocerinae), are reviewed. Chorthippus demokidovi (Ramme) is redescribed presenting comments on its old synonyms C. satunini Mistshenko and C. pygmaeus (Bei-Bienko). Two new species are described; Chorthippus kazdaghensis Mol and Ciplak sp. n. from northwest Anatolia and Chorthippus taurensis Sirin and Ciplak sp. n. front southwest Anatolia. Necessary illustrations of morphology and male calling song/leg movements are provided and a detailed comparison of the three species in the group is presented. It is concluded that the Anatolian species are related to a group of short winged European species (which share presence of hind wings 1/2 - 2/3 of the tegmina in length and tegmina with a precostal field reaching to its apex) such as C. willemsei Harz, C. biroi (Kuthy) and allies. Biogeography of the group is speculated. From their distribution pattern and habitat preference, it is postulated that the present species of the group are relicts of some ancestral stock in southeast Europe which later spread eastward through highland chains in western and southern Anatolia up to Caucasus.