Effect of cage culture environment on farmed fish in terms of metal accumulation


YILMAZ M.

AQUACULTURE RESEARCH, vol.51, no.7, pp.3025-3036, 2020 (SCI-Expanded) identifier identifier

  • Publication Type: Article / Article
  • Volume: 51 Issue: 7
  • Publication Date: 2020
  • Doi Number: 10.1111/are.14642
  • Journal Name: AQUACULTURE RESEARCH
  • Journal Indexes: Science Citation Index Expanded (SCI-EXPANDED), Scopus, Academic Search Premier, Agricultural & Environmental Science Database, Aquatic Science & Fisheries Abstracts (ASFA), Artic & Antarctic Regions, BIOSIS, CAB Abstracts, Environment Index, Food Science & Technology Abstracts, Geobase, INSPEC, Pollution Abstracts, Veterinary Science Database
  • Page Numbers: pp.3025-3036
  • Keywords: farm condition, farmed fish, health risk, Metal accumulation, Sparus aurata, BREAM SPARUS-AURATA, FRESH-WATER FISH, HEAVY-METALS, DICENTRARCHUS-LABRAX, TRACHURUS-TRACHURUS, MEDITERRANEAN SEA, SEASONAL-CHANGES, MULLUS-BARBATUS, ISKENDERUN BAY, TRACE-ELEMENTS
  • Akdeniz University Affiliated: Yes

Abstract

Metal pressure under farm conditions was examined on the gill and muscle tissues of farmed Sparus aurata and compared with their wild counterparts (Sparus aurata, Trachurus trachurus, Mullus barbatus). Al, Mn, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Ni, Pb and Zn accumulation amounts in gill tissue of farmed fish were 28.821, 37.620, 0.136, 0.300, 3.730, 2.441, 3.222, 2.474 and 127.494 mg/kg respectively. Among them, Cd, Cr, Cu and Pb concentrations in gill tissue of farmed fish were higher than that in wild fishes. Metal depositions in muscle tissue of farmed fish were far below that in the gill tissue. The accumulated Al (6.700 mg/kg) in the muscle tissue of farmed fish was higher than in wild ones. The results showed that metal accumulation levels (especially Cd, Cr, Cu and Pb) in the gill tissue of farmed fish indicate metal pressure under captive conditions. Furthermore, the calculated hazard index (HI) and total hazard index (THI) of the considered elements in the edible part of farmed fish were below the level considered safe, which elucidates that farmed fish do not pose any threat to the human consumer in terms of metal toxicity.