Interleukin-1 beta, interleukin-1 receptor antagonist levels in patients with subacute sclerosing panencephalitis and the effects of different treatment protocols


Haspolat S., Anlar B., Kose G., Coskun M., Yegin O.

JOURNAL OF CHILD NEUROLOGY, vol.16, no.6, pp.417-420, 2001 (SCI-Expanded) identifier

  • Publication Type: Article / Article
  • Volume: 16 Issue: 6
  • Publication Date: 2001
  • Doi Number: 10.2310/7010.2001.7123
  • Journal Name: JOURNAL OF CHILD NEUROLOGY
  • Journal Indexes: Science Citation Index Expanded (SCI-EXPANDED), Scopus
  • Page Numbers: pp.417-420
  • Akdeniz University Affiliated: Yes

Abstract

Subacute sclerosing panencephalitis is a rare progressive inflammatory disease of the central nervous system caused by a persistent aberrant measles virus infection. Cytokines are polypeptides that regulate immune responses and inflammatory reactions. Interleukin-1 beta has been implicated as a central mediator of tissue damage and destruction in a number of central nervous system diseases. Interleukin-1 receptor antagonist could function as an important anti-inflammatory cytokine. We studied interleukin-1 beta and interleukin-1 receptor antagonist levels in the cerebrospinal fluids of patients with subacute sclerosing panencephalitis and evaluated the effects of different treatment protocols on these cytokines. Interleukin-1 beta and interleukin-1 receptor antagonist levels were measured in 15 patients who had a recent diagnosis of subacute sclerosing panencephalitis (group 1), 6 patients who had been treated with isoprinosine (group 2), 5 patients with intraventricular interferon-alpha (group 3), and 6 patients with interferon-beta (group 4). The results were compared within the groups and also with the results of 10 patients with other neurologic disease (group 5). The interleukin-1 beta concentrations in cerebrospinal fluid and sera were all below the detection limits (3.9 pg/mL). Interleukin-1 receptor antagonist levels were not statistically different, except for the group treated with intraventricular interferon-a. Interleukin-1 receptor antagonist levels were 170 +/- 52, 175 +/- 58, 1605 +/- 518, 77.5 +/- 24, and 108 +/- 18 pg/mL in groups 1 to 5, respectively. Interleukin-1 receptor antagonist levels and cerebrospinal fluid serum ratios were significantly increased during interferon-alpha treatment. In conclusion, interleukin-1 and interleukin-1 receptor antagonist levels were not elevated in the patients with subacute sclerosing panencephalitis. The only treatment protocol that affects interleukin-1 receptor antagonist levels in cerebrospinal fluid was intraventricular interferon-alpha. Further studies on higher numbers of patients may better document the immunologic status of patients with subacute sclerosing panencephalitis and the effects of different treatment modes.