Comparison of three different nutrition screening tools for pediatric inpatients


SEREMET KÜRKLÜ N., Geyin F., Ceylan L., Korkut Genc D., KAMARLI ALTUN H., KARAÇİL ERMUMCU M. Ş.

Nutrition in Clinical Practice, vol.37, no.3, pp.698-704, 2022 (SCI-Expanded) identifier identifier identifier

  • Publication Type: Article / Article
  • Volume: 37 Issue: 3
  • Publication Date: 2022
  • Doi Number: 10.1002/ncp.10828
  • Journal Name: Nutrition in Clinical Practice
  • Journal Indexes: Science Citation Index Expanded (SCI-EXPANDED), Scopus, CAB Abstracts, CINAHL, EMBASE, International Pharmaceutical Abstracts, MEDLINE, Veterinary Science Database
  • Page Numbers: pp.698-704
  • Keywords: hospitalization, malnutrition, nutrition screening, pediatrics, sensitivity, MALNUTRITION, RISK, STANDARDS, VALIDITY, CHILDREN, SCORE
  • Akdeniz University Affiliated: Yes

Abstract

© 2022 American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition.Background: Early detection of children at risk of developing malnutrition during hospitalization prevents the development of complications. This study aims to determine the malnutrition risk of pediatric inpatients by using three different nutrition screening tools and to evaluate the reliability/sensitivity of the screening tools. Methods: This cross-sectional study included 176 children who were 1–16 years of age and were admitted to the pediatrics service of a second-line hospital. Body weight and height were used to evaluate the nutrition status of children. Age- and sex-specific z-score values for height for age (HFA), weight for age (WFA), and body mass index for age (BFA) were indicators of malnutrition. The Screening Tool for Risk of Impaired Nutritional Status and Growth (STRONGkids), Pediatric Yorkhill Malnutrition Score (PYMS), and Pediatric Nutrition Screening Tool (PNST) were used under the responsibility of pediatricians and dietitians to evaluate the risk of malnutrition in children. Results: At admission, according to the HFA, BFA, and WFA SD scores (SDSs), the incidence of malnutrition in children was 8.5%, 14.8%, and 6.3%, respectively. Three screening tools determined that WFA SDSs were significantly higher in children without malnutrition risk than in those at risk of malnutrition (P < 0.05). PYMS revealed a relatively higher sensitivity of 90.9% and 84.6% for WFA and BFA, respectively, and PNST revealed a relatively higher sensitivity of 88.9% for HFA. Conclusions: PYMS and PNST are suitable for use in malnutrition risk assessment in pediatric inpatients because of the screening tools’ high sensitivity.