Evaluation of Incidental Thyroid Nodules in Cancer Patients


Cansu G. B., YILMAZ N., Toru S., SARI R., Ocak G. G., ARICI C., ...More

Journal of the National Medical Association, vol.109, no.4, pp.299-306, 2017 (SCI-Expanded) identifier identifier identifier

  • Publication Type: Article / Article
  • Volume: 109 Issue: 4
  • Publication Date: 2017
  • Doi Number: 10.1016/j.jnma.2017.02.011
  • Journal Name: Journal of the National Medical Association
  • Journal Indexes: Science Citation Index Expanded (SCI-EXPANDED), Scopus
  • Page Numbers: pp.299-306
  • Keywords: Incidental thyroid nodule, Thyroid cancer, Second malignancy, POSITRON-EMISSION-TOMOGRAPHY, FINE-NEEDLE-ASPIRATION, HEALTHY-SUBJECTS, MALIGNANCY, PREVALENCE, RISK, ULTRASONOGRAPHY, PET, CT, EPIDEMIOLOGY
  • Akdeniz University Affiliated: Yes

Abstract

© 2017 National Medical AssociationObjective Frequency of thyroid cancer in incidental thyroid nodules identified by imaging techniques in cancer patients is higher than that in the normal population. In the retrospective study, we have both investigated the incidence of thyroid cancer in incidentally identified nodules and compared the imaging techniques to determine whether there is any difference between them in detection of malign nodules. Methods A total of 7319 patients who underwent thyroid fine-needle aspiration biopsy (FNAB) were included in the study. The data of 174 patients who had previously been diagnosed with a hematologic or solid malignancy prior to the FNAB procedure and had incidentally identified thyroid nodules were evaluated retrospectively. Results Eighty-six (49.5%) of the incidental nodules were identified with ultrasonography (USG), 62 (35.6%) with positron emission tomography (PET) or PET/computed tomography (PET/CT), and 26 (14.9%) with CT. As a result of thyroidectomy, papillary carcinoma was identified in 8 (4.6%) patients, and metastasis to the thyroid of a primary cancer was found in 3 (1.7%) patients. While the papillary carcinoma proportion in the nodules identified by USG was 3.4%, PET/CT was 8.9%. A cut-off maximal standardized uptake value of 11.6 in PET/CT indicated malignancy achieving a sensitivity of 83.3% and a specificity of 91.1%. Conclusion Whether the nodule in the incidental thyroid nodules of cancer patients is identified using USG or PET/CT, the risk of thyroid cancer is similar. However, cancer risk is higher in the event of a higher focal uptake in the nodules identified by PET/CT.