Work Time Matters for Mental Health: A Gender Analysis of Paid and Unpaid Labor in the United States


Piovani C., AYDINER AVŞAR N.

REVIEW OF RADICAL POLITICAL ECONOMICS, vol.53, no.4, pp.579-589, 2021 (SSCI) identifier identifier

  • Publication Type: Article / Article
  • Volume: 53 Issue: 4
  • Publication Date: 2021
  • Doi Number: 10.1177/04866134211035565
  • Journal Name: REVIEW OF RADICAL POLITICAL ECONOMICS
  • Journal Indexes: Social Sciences Citation Index (SSCI), Scopus, Academic Search Premier, IBZ Online, International Bibliography of Social Sciences, Periodicals Index Online, ABI/INFORM, American History and Life, EconLit, Index Islamicus, Political Science Complete, Public Affairs Index, Sociological abstracts, Worldwide Political Science Abstracts
  • Page Numbers: pp.579-589
  • Keywords: gender, mental health, work, FAMILY, CONFLICT, DIVISION
  • Akdeniz University Affiliated: Yes

Abstract

Based on Midlife in the United States (MIDUS) survey data for 2013-14, this paper examines the association between work time (inclusive of both paid and unpaid work time) and the mental health outcomes of men and women in the United States, controlling for economic and social buffers, education, and demographic factors. In the United States, even though women constitute close to half of the paid labor force, they still perform the lion's share of unpaid work. The findings indicate that total work time is positively related with emotional distress for women, while there is no statistically significant relationship for men. For women, the relationship between work time and mental health is primarily driven by unpaid work rather than paid work. Evaluating the relationship between mental health and both productive and reproductive work is critical to develop effective public policies toward gender equity and social well-being. JEL classification: I14, J16, J01